Not so much a security #FAIL…

…as a security measure overtaken by the march of time…

security fail2

And taking a broader view…

security fail

Approach to the NATS installation at the top of Titterstone Clee Hill.

I’m kind of reminded, though, of a sign I saw Marrickville, Sydney. The sign on the door of the WC at the station announced that it was locked for security reasons. Security is sometimes seen as a tripod model consisting of integrity, confidentiality, and availability. As someone I once worked for put it: ‘the most important of the three is availability.’ By which he probably meant that if you have something so locked down that the people who should have access to it don’t, then what you have is not security. Even if that isn’t what he meant, it’s what I believe.

David Harley
Small Blue-Green World
ESET Senior Research Fellow

Wish I’d thought of this…

…though when we returned to Shropshire, I really wanted to rent a former smithy in Atcham. It seemed just the place for a wordsmith. This, though, was spotted in Ledbury, in Herefordshire.

cartoonery 1

I may yet rename this blog, though I don’t really have the chutzpah to call myself a cartoonist…

David Harley
Small Blue-Green World
ESET Senior Research Fellow

Security gives you wings

I think I will have seen everything, when I see an elephant… er, tree… Talk about the elephant in the room…

elephant tree

At Quinta dos Vales, near Portimao in the Algarve, which is a winery with an interesting sculpture park. Has nothing to do with dataholism except that I was there with a party of miscellaneous people from ESET and from the security product testing industry – this was part of the après-ski section of a recent testing Summit, except that it happened before the Summit, so I suppose it ought to be referred to as devant-ski. That’s devant, the French for ‘before’, not deviant. Though the photograph below of three security nerds molesting another sculpture at the same site might convince you otherwise.

gives you wings

Should I name names? Probably not. That would compromise the potential for future blackmail.

David Harley
ESET Senior Research Fellow