About David Harley

David Harley is an IT security researcher, author/editor and consultant living in the United Kingdom, known for his books on and research into malware, Mac security, anti-malware product testing, and management of email abuse.

Harley has worked in IT since the mid-1980s, working initially at the Royal Free Hospital in London. From 1989 to 2001 he worked for the Imperial Cancer Research Fund (now Cancer Research UK), where he eventually moved into full-time security. In 2001 he rejoined the National Health Service where he ran the Threat Assessment Centre. Since leaving the NHS in 2006 to work as an independent consultant, he has worked closely with the security company ESET where since 2011 he holds the position of Senior Research Fellow.  In 2009 he was elected to the Board of Directors of the Anti-Malware Testing Standards Organization (AMTSO), but stood down in February 2012, when Righard Zwienenberg, president of AMTSO, joined ESET, so that there wouldn’t be more than one Board member representing the same AMTSO member entity.

Bibliography

  • Anonymous; et al. (2001). Maximum Security Third Edition. SAMS. Chapter 17 “Viruses and Worms”, Chapter 18 “Trojans.”
  • Harley, David, Robert Slade and Urs E. Gattiker (2001). Viruses Revealed. McGraw-Hill Companies.  Co-Author.
  • Anonymous; et al. (2002). Maximum Security Fourth Edition. SAMS. ISBN 0-672-32459-8. Revised Chapter 17 “Viruses and Worms”, Chapter 18 “Trojans.”
  • Bosworth, Seymour, Kabay M.E.; et al. (2002). Computer Security Handbook. John Wiley. Co-wrote Chapter 49, “Medical Records Security” with Paul Brusil.
  • Paulus, S., Pohlmann N., Reimer, H.; et al. (2004). ISSE 2004: Securing Electronic Business Processes. Vieweg. Massmailers: New Threats Need Novel Anti-Virus Measures.
  • Bidgoli, Hossein; et al. (2006). Handbook of Information Security. Wiley. Volume 3, “E-Mail Threats and Vulnerabilities.”
  • Schiller, Craig A.,, Binkley, Jim; et al. (2007). Botnets: the Killer Web App. Syngress. Co-wrote Chapter 5, “Botnet Detection: Tools and Techniques” with Jim Binkley.
  • Harley, David; et al. (2007). AVIEN Malware Defense Guide for the Enterprise. Syngress. ISBN 978-1-59749-164-8. (Editor, technical editor, several chapters.)
  • Baccas, Paul; et al. (2008). OS X Exploits and Defense. Syngress. Chapter 3: “Malicious Macs: Malware and the Mac.” Chapter 4: “Malware Detection and the Mac.”
  • Bidgoli, Hossein; et al. (2008). The Handbook of Computer Networks. Wiley. Volume 3, “E-Mail Threats and Vulnerabilities.”
  • Eddy Willems (in process). Cyberdanger (already published in Dutch and German). Translation, review, editing, contributing some content.

Most of his writing since joining ESET is available here:

Most of his writing for other magazines, web sites etc. is available from or via the Geek Peninsula blog, as are most of the above writing.

Among his other security-related (sometimes) blogs are:

Advertisements

The Fake Conference Season Opens

Even the fake conference crowd are trying to drag me back into testing (again). Yes, ‘Making sense of comparative anti-malware testing’ sounds like a perfect fit for the World Gene Convention. Not. I’d have been more impressed if they’d picked up on my long-gone and rather peripheral connection with the Human Genome Project.

At least the repeated invitations to a dodgy forensics conference have some theoretical relevance to what I do now.

But seems that the Gene Genie has just picked up an article I wrote of Elsevier in 2009. Or, more probably, just the abstract.

F minus for effort. F double minus for ‘would you please respond to our earlier spam?’

David Harley 

Decalcifying the NHS*

Apparently NHS England’s work on commissioning support services and marketing development – not to be confused with privatization, apparently – is being led by one Bob Ricketts.

Sometimes I feel like I’m living in a Dickens novel.

*Yes, I know that calcium deficiency isn’t the most common cause of rickets. ‘Depriving the NHS of vitamin D’ just didn’t seem to cut it as a title.

David Harley